The New Face of Hunger

The pictures below are from a recent article published by National Geographic Magazine titled, “The New Face of Hunger: Why are people malnourished in the richest country on Earth?” The article details the plight of several families across the United States who are part of the 48 million Americans that the government calls, “food insecure,” meaning that sometime in the previous year they did not have enough to eat.

The article contrasts the public’s typical view of those who often go hungry with the situations real people face every day. One-sixth of Americans don’t have enough food to eat, yet most of these households have an adult that is employed full time. Many of them have cars and computers. Sometimes they are overweight. However, underneath it all is the truth that wages and salaries don’t stretch as far as they did in the past. Many of the “luxuries” that these households own are often necessities needed to perform their jobs and are often purchased used and at discounted rates. Additionally, food, especially healthy and nutritious food, is simply more expensive and sometimes less available than unhealthy processed foods.

Interfaith sees families faced with these situations every day. A crisis such as an unexpected car repair or job loss has put them in the bind of choosing to feed and clothe their family or pay their bills. They turn to us, hoping for assistance, which we try our best to provide. These individuals work hard to provide for their families, but sometimes it’s just simply not enough.

We encourage you to click here and read the full article published by National Geographic Magazine and learn more about the new face of hunger here in America and about some of the situations our clients face every day.

Kristin Hahn and her grandmother, Janet Groven, visit a weekly soup kitchen in Charles City, Iowa. "By the end of the month we have nothing," says Groven, who also depends on a food pantry to feed her family. Of America's 48 million "food insecure"--the modern term for the hungry--more than half are white, and more than half live outside cities.

Kristin Hahn and her grandmother, Janet Groven, visit a weekly soup kitchen in Charles City, Iowa. "By the end of the month we have nothing," says Groven, who also depends on a food pantry to feed her family. Of America's 48 million "food insecure"--the modern term for the hungry--more than half are white, and more than half live outside cities.

Rosemarie Patronella, 74, eats a lunch of ramen noodles and buttered rice in her room at a Ramada in Houston. Hunger among the elderly is particularly severe in Texas and has risen since 2007. Patronella is a retired schoolteacher who carefully stocks up on food from charities to ensure she has enough. 

Rosemarie Patronella, 74, eats a lunch of ramen noodles and buttered rice in her room at a Ramada in Houston. Hunger among the elderly is particularly severe in Texas and has risen since 2007. Patronella is a retired schoolteacher who carefully stocks up on food from charities to ensure she has enough. 

New York City's Bronx borough, home to America's poorest congressional district, is crammed with fast-food restaurants but has few grocery stores, earning it a reputation as a food desert. 

New York City's Bronx borough, home to America's poorest congressional district, is crammed with fast-food restaurants but has few grocery stores, earning it a reputation as a food desert.